Add เลย กิจกรรมสนุกๆ
พร้อมรางวัลมากมาย FREE!

Solutions for Toddler Feeding Problems (Part II)

14 MAR 2016

Experts offer tips for parents of picky eaters.

ตอน2.jpg

Dilemma: How should I handle a 3-year-old who refuses to eat dinner nearly every night and would rather feed the food to the dog?
Solution: "Playing with food is normal, and fun for a kid," Neville says. When it happens on a regular basis, something else may be at work, however.

Tuckered-out toddlers may not be particularly hungry for the evening meal, and would rather share their food with the dog.
Or, your child could be lobbing food to get a rise out of you.

"Toddlers test everything out -- including your patience," Delmonico says.

Solve this toddler feeding problem by staying cool while sending your child the signal that mealtime is for eating, and not so much for playing. Or for feeding Fido.

"Each time your child feeds the dog or throws food on the floor, calmly remove him from his high chair," says Shu. "If he indicates he wants to eat, put him back in. After taking him out a couple of times, that meal is over."

Of course, removing the dog from the room at mealtimes will reduce a toddler's temptation, too.

Dilemma: My little one wants to feed himself. When is it OK to give children cups and utensils?
Solution: Probably earlier than you think.
You can give children a plastic-coated baby spoon to hold when you start feeding them solids, and they can handle a sippy cup with water, infant formula, or breastmilk between 6-9 months old, Shu says.

Toddler forks with blunt tines come later. "Most children can use a fork neatly by 3 to 4 years of age," says Shu.

Don't expect much food or drink to actually get into your toddler's mouth at first. Prepare yourself for messy mealtimes, but don't let that deter you from letting your toddler try to self-feed.

"Children learn by imitation and they need to practice self-feeding," Neville says.

Dilemma: I have a 3-year-old who still wants to be fed like a baby. What should I do?
Solution: "Toddlers are more likely to feed themselves when they see others doing the same," Shu says. As much as possible, sit at the table together as a family so that your toddler can imitate your behavior.

If your child has been feeding himself and stopped, there could be a reason, such as a younger sibling that's getting the attention your toddler desires, says Neville.

Whatever the reason, Neville cautions against getting into a battle of wills over toddler eating issues. Here are some tricks that may encourage self-feeding:
•   Provide finger foods that they can manage to get into their mouths all by themselves.
•   Use a favorite dish and cup.

"If you know your child is capable of self-feeding, give him the food and the utensils and just let him be, and chances are he'll come around," Delmonico says.

Shu says some children have developmental delays that prevent them from feeding themselves. Talk with your pediatrician about your concerns.

Dilemma: I've noticed that my toddler doesn't eat very much at mealtimes. What should I do to improve my child's food intake?
Solution: In this case, your child may not necessarily be a picky eater. Grazing -- characterized as near-continuous nibbling or drinking, or both, throughout the day -- may be to blame.

"Grazers are often full when meal times roll around," says Delmonico.

Discourage grazing by loosely scheduling healthy meals and snacks. Think of snacks as mini-meals, and serve the same foods you would at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, such as whole grains, lean protein sources, fruits, and vegetables.

When you serve healthy foods for snacks, there's no need to be concerned if your child skimps on the next meal.

In addition to offering an array of healthy foods throughout the day, trust the cues your child is giving you about her hunger level.

"Kids instinctively regulate their appetites by eating when they are hungry and stopping when full," says Neville.

Dilemma: It seems as if my toddler hardly eats anything at all. How do I know my child is OK?
Solution: During the first year of life, children typically triple their birth weight and add upwards of 10 inches of height to their frames. Growth slows down after a child's first birthday, and so does appetite.

"It's not unusual for kids to go through phases where it seems they barely eat enough to get by," says Neville.

The good news about this toddler feeding problem? Left to their own devices, children typically tend to eat what they need. However, some children may not be getting enough for a variety of reasons.

To allay your fears, ask your pediatrician if your child is growing well according to measurements (head circumference, weight, and length) on the growth charts. You may need to consult with a registered dietitian about your child's eating habits.

 

ย้อนกลับ
Suggest this article to your friends
Rate this Article
1Point
2Point
3Point
4Point
5Point
Toddler Stage
  • Encouraging thinking, problem-solving and other skills Encouraging thinking, problem-solving and other... icon-link
  • 10 Items You Must Always Have on You With a Toddler 10 Items You Must Always Have on You With a Tod... icon-link
  • 7 Great Activities to Improve Your Toddler's Vocabulary 7 Great Activities to Improve Your Toddler's Vo... icon-link
  • LOVE PAST THE BEHAVIOR LOVE PAST THE BEHAVIOR icon-link
  • Tips for Parenting Your 2-Year-Old Tips for Parenting Your 2-Year-Old icon-link
  • Why play is important Why play is important icon-link
  • Teeth Grinding Teeth Grinding icon-link
  • Fitness and Your 2 to 3-Year-Old Fitness and Your 2 to 3-Year-Old icon-link
  • 9 WAYS TO HELP YOUR TODDLER WORK THROUGH ANGER 9 WAYS TO HELP YOUR TODDLER WORK THROUGH ANGER icon-link
  • 5 things about raising boys I wish I had known 5 things about raising boys I wish I had known icon-link
  • Finding the Right Read Finding the Right Read icon-link
  • 6 Creative Ways to Keep Kids in Their Beds 6 Creative Ways to Keep Kids in Their Beds icon-link
  • 6 Things You Should Never Say to Your Kids 6 Things You Should Never Say to Your Kids icon-link
  • Self-Feeding Self-Feeding icon-link
  • Hand and Finger Skills: 2 Year Olds Hand and Finger Skills: 2 Year Olds icon-link
  • 7 tips to improve your toddler’s vocabulary 7 tips to improve your toddler’s vocabulary icon-link
  • Pedestrian safety: walking and crossing roads Pedestrian safety: walking and crossing roads icon-link
  • Sharing and Learning to Share Sharing and Learning to Share icon-link
  • Is It Okay To Bribe My Toddler With Candy? Is It Okay To Bribe My Toddler With Candy? icon-link
  • Communication and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old Communication and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old icon-link
  • Bedtime Trouble Bedtime Trouble icon-link
  • The Truth About Being A Single Mom The Truth About Being A Single Mom icon-link
  • Baby Carriers: Always Use in the Car Baby Carriers: Always Use in the Car icon-link
  • Stuttering What Parents Can Do Stuttering What Parents Can Do icon-link
  • Teach Toddler Not To Hit? Teach Toddler Not To Hit? icon-link
  • Self-Feeding Self-Feeding icon-link
  • Bathroom Behaviors Bathroom Behaviors icon-link
  • Play is how young children start to get ready for school. Play is how young children start to get ready f... icon-link
  • Child Safety First Child Safety First icon-link
  • Positive Parenting Tips Positive Parenting Tips icon-link
  • Health risks linked with passive smoking Health risks linked with passive smoking icon-link
  • Why breakfast is important Why breakfast is important icon-link
  • Teaching your child how to get dressed Teaching your child how to get dressed icon-link
  • I've heard that infant swimming in chlorinated, indoor pools might cause childhood asthma. Is it safe for my 5-month-old to swim indoors? I've heard that infant swimming in chlorinated,... icon-link
  • Talking and listening to your toddler. Talking and listening to your toddler. icon-link
  • What are the signs and symptoms of iron deficiency in children? What are the signs and symptoms of iron deficie... icon-link
  • Breath Holding Breath Holding icon-link
  • Why do some children suck their thumbs? Why do some children suck their thumbs? icon-link
  • Why outdoor play is important Why outdoor play is important icon-link
  • Making the case for less sugar Making the case for less sugar icon-link
  • How and when should I move my child from a crib to a bed? How and when should I move my child from a crib... icon-link
  • Developmental Milestones for Toddlers (1-2 Years of Age) Developmental Milestones for Toddlers (1-2 Year... icon-link
  • Toddler teeth issues Toddler teeth issues icon-link
  • Healthy drinks for toddlers Healthy drinks for toddlers icon-link
  • Afraid of the bath Afraid of the bath icon-link
  • The best way to brush your child’s teeth The best way to brush your child’s teeth icon-link
  • Child Safety First (Toddlers 1-2 Years of Age) Child Safety First (Toddlers 1-2 Years of Age) icon-link
  • HEATSTROKE SAFETY TIPS HEATSTROKE SAFETY TIPS icon-link
  • Why Toddlers Ask Why Why Toddlers Ask Why icon-link
  • HOW TO PREVENT HEAD INJURIES IN CHILDREN HOW TO PREVENT HEAD INJURIES IN CHILDREN icon-link
  • Childproofing Your Home - Six Spots to Tackle Childproofing Your Home - Six Spots to Tackle icon-link
  • Feeding a Sick Baby Feeding a Sick Baby icon-link
  • Childhood Illnesses Every Parent Should Know Childhood Illnesses Every Parent Should Know icon-link
  • Baby Napping DOs & DON'Ts Baby Napping DOs & DON'Ts icon-link
  • How to deal with a tantrum in public How to deal with a tantrum in public icon-link
  • 5 Perfectly Understandable Reasons For Toddler Tantrums 5 Perfectly Understandable Reasons For Toddler ... icon-link
  • Child Safety First (Toddlers 2-3 Years of Age) Child Safety First (Toddlers 2-3 Years of Age) icon-link
  • Reactions to food Reactions to food icon-link
  • The Benefits of Bath Time for Babies The Benefits of Bath Time for Babies icon-link
  • The Educational Benefits of Playing with Blocks The Educational Benefits of Playing with Blocks icon-link
  • Sleep and Your 1-to 2-Year-Old Sleep and Your 1-to 2-Year-Old icon-link
  • Toilet Training Tips for Parents Toilet Training Tips for Parents icon-link
  • What can I do to make my child less anxious about his or her first visit to the dentist? What can I do to make my child less anxious abo... icon-link
  • What do I do if my child is a picky eater? What do I do if my child is a picky eater? icon-link
  • Toilet Training: When is a child ready? Toilet Training: When is a child ready? icon-link
  • Where Should My Toddler Sleep? Where Should My Toddler Sleep? icon-link